July Interview Tips

Listen to understand, not to respond During your interview, it’s only natural to try and form responses or follow-up questions while your interviewer is talking to reduce the silences. Resist this urge and really focus on what the person across from you is saying. They’re asking a question for a very specific reason and will want a thoughtful answer that speaks to all parts of what was asked. By starting to formulate your response too early, you run the risk of missing crucial information or not hearing everything they want you to address. Taking a second after the question to collect your thoughts is much better than coming across as inattentive or unfocused.

July Interview Tips

Don’t start at the beginning During an interview, you’ll almost always be asked about your experience. It may seem tempting to start with your education and end with your latest and most relevant work. However, your interviewer might stop you at any time to ask for more details or to move to another question. This leaves you at risk of never getting to the experience you feel most qualifies you for the prospective position. Start from your most recent experience and work your way back. This will make sure the interviewer is fresh and attentive when you’re talking about your most relevant employment. You also won’t have to worry about spending too much time talking about an entry level role or internship and not leaving enough time for your latest experience.

July Interview Tips

Color yourself prepared When it’s time for a face-to-face interview, a few subtle notes can really enhance your professional attire. Wear light-colored, well-pressed clothes to make your outfit easier on your interviewer’s eyes. Also, try to avoid bright red as this can set off subconscious warning signs. Loud patterns, bright jewelry and eye-catching accessories also run the risk of diverting your interviewers attention onto what you’re wearing instead of what you’re saying. When it comes to an interview, you can’t go wrong with subtle pastels, black and browns. It may seem like a very small aspect of the interview, but you never want your appearance distracting from your experience.

June Interview Tips

Take a stand One small change that can make a big difference during a phone interview is your posture. If you’re laid back on a couch or slumped down in an office chair, you risk coming off as nonchalant and lacking energy. Top companies now recommend standing during phone interviews to make sure your voice projects and you convey a tone of being in control. Make sure you are still in a position where you can reference your notes, resume or portfolio easily like a standing desk or at a taller counter. Also, be sure you’re not pacing back and forth during the call. This will make you come across as anxious or nervous.

June Interview Tips

Act like you’re face-to-face If you’re conducting a phone interview, try to create a real interview environment. Most companies recommend dressing like you’re going in for an in-person interview to get in the right mindset, but even some smaller adjustments will make you more comfortable during the process. Use a speakerphone so you can speak with your hands and not worry about dropping a headset. Refer to notes, but be sure you’re not shuffling papers or reading your experience from your resume – trust us, interviewers can tell. Finally, don’t conduct the interview from your car while driving or from your current employer if you’re looking to change jobs. When you’re distracted, it will make you seem less passionate, engaged and prepared.

June Interview Tips

Treat all interviews equally. For executive level interviews, you might find yourself meeting with colleagues who would be on your level and even direct reports in addition to upper management. Make sure you keep focused during those interviews and treat them professionally, just like you would with a supervisor. It can be a natural reaction to be more casual around your peers or more authoritative around your subordinates, but it’s likely that all of these individuals will be asked to weigh in on your fit for the role, so make sure to stay professional, stay courteous, and be consistent with your information and approach.

May Interview Tips

Round out your skillset. There are hundreds of online courses available from Oxford, Harvard ManageMentor and others through iTunes or their own subscription service. Most of these take just a few hours to complete and can help round out any knowledge gaps on your resume before an interview. Look at keywords in the job posting and search for online courses that address them. Then complete the courses and talk about the training if the topic comes up. This will show that you are willing to go the extra mile, educate yourself on topics important to your position, and open to continuing education once you’re on the job.

May Interview Tips

Read. Then read more. Of course you’ll do research on the company before your interview, but it shouldn’t stop there. Come prepared with what the company says about itself, what the industry says about them, what their competition is doing, and industry news and advances. The company you’re interviewing with is full of people that know what they do. That information alone will make you seem prepared, but not an asset. When you come to the interview looking and sounding like an expert in your field, it will take you much farther than just knowing a mission statement.

May Interview Tips

Plan for no. ‘’The first thing to decide before walking into any negotiation is what to do if the other fellow says no.” This is a famous quote by British statesman Ernest Bevin and it’s just as applicable to job interviews as it is for negotiations. Plan what your next move would be if you don’t get the job. Don’t expect a no, but plan for one. This will make you more confident and comfortable in the interview. Of course you want the position, but acting like you need it can make you seem like a less desirable candidate and put you in a poor position when negotiating salary and benefits.

April Interview Tips

Talk with someone on your level If you really want to know what it will be like to work in a department, ask if you can speak with someone at your level when you come in for the interview. This will give you insight into management tactics, workloads and introduce you to one of your potential coworkers. Hiring managers likely have conducted multiple interviews and have standard answers to common candidate questions, but a potential colleague would simply answer your questions honestly and openly. When you’re trying to determine an interview time and discussing whom you will speak with, don’t be afraid to request some time with someone on your level. Most employers will be happy to accommodate, and if they won’t, their reasons why could also be revealing.