Archive for June 2018

June Interview Tips

Take a stand One small change that can make a big difference during a phone interview is your posture. If you’re laid back on a couch or slumped down in an office chair, you risk coming off as nonchalant and lacking energy. Top companies now recommend standing during phone interviews to make sure your voice projects and you convey a tone of being in control. Make sure you are still in a position where you can reference your notes, resume or portfolio easily like a standing desk or at a taller counter. Also, be sure you’re not pacing back and forth during the call. This will make you come across as anxious or nervous.

Read More

June Interview Tips

Act like you’re face-to-face If you’re conducting a phone interview, try to create a real interview environment. Most companies recommend dressing like you’re going in for an in-person interview to get in the right mindset, but even some smaller adjustments will make you more comfortable during the process. Use a speakerphone so you can speak with your hands and not worry about dropping a headset. Refer to notes, but be sure you’re not shuffling papers or reading your experience from your resume – trust us, interviewers can tell. Finally, don’t conduct the interview from your car while driving or from your current employer if you’re looking to change jobs. When you’re distracted, it will make you seem less passionate, engaged and prepared.

Read More

June Interview Tips

Treat all interviews equally. For executive level interviews, you might find yourself meeting with colleagues who would be on your level and even direct reports in addition to upper management. Make sure you keep focused during those interviews and treat them professionally, just like you would with a supervisor. It can be a natural reaction to be more casual around your peers or more authoritative around your subordinates, but it’s likely that all of these individuals will be asked to weigh in on your fit for the role, so make sure to stay professional, stay courteous, and be consistent with your information and approach.

Read More